johnmac's rants

Monday, February 08, 2016

Are Hackers Evil?

(From the Westchester Guardian of February 4, 2016  -- http://www.westchesterguardian.com/2_4_16/wg_2_4_fin.pdf -- There is an excellent Cover page piece by ex-Congressperson and co-Chair of the 9/11 Commission Lee Hamilton, "What Will It Take To End Income Inequality" in the issue)

Creative Disruption  
by John F. McMullen   
Creative Disruption is a continuing series examining the impact of constantly accelerating technology on the world around us. These changes normally happen under our personal radar until we find that the world as we knew it is no more.  

Are Hackers Evil?
Are Hackers Evil? One would think so from reading the press or watching television – with the possible exception of the loosely connected group of hackers, “Anonymous,” who are treated like the Leslie Charteris character, “The Saint” (the “Robin Hood of Modern Crime”), because they perpetrate mayhem upon those that most of us can’t stomach, such as ISIS and the Westboro Baptist Church. The rest of them, most of us think, exist only to steal our identities or foul up our connections.
So, are all “hackers” evil or, at least, criminals? In one word, No! 
First, we should define the word. To the early computer enthusiasts, a hacker was simply one who “pushed the envelope,” who did things with hardware and software that, not only hadn’t been done before but hadn’t even been thought of by the people who developed the hardware and software. In today’s world, there are many conflicting definitions and, herein, lies the problem:
  • ·       New Hacker’s Dictionary (http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/definition/hacker) -- a hacker is a clever programmer.Eric Raymond, Editor of the dictionary, deprecates the use of this term for someone who attempts to crack someone else's system or otherwise uses programming or expert knowledge to act maliciously. He prefers the term “cracker for this meaning.

·      Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hacker_(term)) --
Currently, "hacker" is used in two main conflicting ways:
1.   as someone who is able to subvert computer security; if doing so for malicious purposes, the person can also be called a cracker.
2.   an adherent of the technology and programming subculture.
White-hat (hacking for the enjoyment of exploration) 
Black-hat (hacking to find exploits and system weaknesses, see 
cracker) 
and Grey-hat (someone who is a little of both)


In short, it is difficult to find a universal definition of the word. The three examples above all agree that a hacker is gifted technically and may (or may not) use these skills for malicious purposes. They all join in referring to those who do use the skills for malicious purposes as crackers. 
Unfortunately, one never sees the term cracker in the popular press. Every time there is a break-in to a credit card or department store database and identity information is stolen, the term hacker appears in big bold headlines. Yet the headline writers as well as the authors of the articles themselves should know better. All they have to do is have some familiarity with Steven Levy’s wonderful 1985 book, “Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution,” in which he traces the origins of the hacking revolutions to the MIT Computer Lab, where young enthusiasts first started pushing the computer envelope, and the MITS company of Albuquerque, New Mexico, which developed the first microcomputer, the “Altair,” and was the home of the company known as “Micro-soft” (later “Microsoft”).
Hackers have long railed about what they see as the broad brush that paints them all as criminals. One difficulty that existed in the late 1980s and 1990s was that hackers and law enforcement had a different view of what malicious activity was. The common hacker definition was “do no harm,” a definition that gave implicit permission to hackers, without permission, to go into computer systems belonging to others – normally large “mainframe systems” – as long as nothing was disrupted or broken. Businesses and law enforcement took quite another view: if you did not have explicit permission to be there, it was against the law to be there.
What was the reason for this battle of wills? – after all, burglars and law enforcement agree on the definition of burglary. Mark Abene, known in the hacker world as “Phiber Optik” during that period and considered a programming genius from his early teen years, explained his rationale once, “I want to know everything I can about computers and want to make it my life. The operating system of the Internet and large systems is UNIX. I have an Apple II and UNIX can’t run on that or other microcomputers so the only way that I can really learn is to access larger systems that that have that operating system, and I don’t hurt anything when I do, so it’s worth the risk.
Mark, unfortunately, did spend a year in prison not long after for being in computers to which he didn’t belong (although many in the hacker community thought that the prosecution was part of a public relations campaign by law enforcement to obtain greater access to computers. Such charges have been hotly denied by law enforcement). Mark today is a highly respected computer security consultant.
That period was a very interesting period as computer people and law enforcement tied to arrive at understandings of the ramifications of this rapidly evolving technology. Hacker conferences and meetings such as the annual “DEFCON” in Las Vegas, the annual “Computers, Freedom & Privacy Conferences” (held around North America), and the monthly “2600 Meetings” (held around the world) brought together hackers and law enforcement; when one thinks of such meetings, it must be noted that they are rather unusual – after all, if burglars had a conference, they wouldn’t invite the police.
The unusualness of this was brought home to me at the first Computers, Freedom, and Privacy conference in 1990 in San Francisco. At a break, I was standing in the hall talking to “Phiber;” John Draper, one of the early hackers, known as “Capt’n Crunch;” and Kevin Kelly, founding editor of Wired Magazine. Phiber turned to us and said “There’s Don Delaney. He was my arresting officer.” Draper responded “Over there is Don Ingraham. He was my prosecuting attorney.” Kelly then asked me if we shouldn’t feel out of it, having neither an arresting officer nor a prosecuting attorney. 
The 2600 conferences take their name from “2600 Magazine: The Hacker Quarterly” (www.2600.com) which in turn takes its name from 2600 MhZ, the frequency of the Bell Telephone network’s communications system. It was the knowledge of that frequency that allowed hackers such as Draper to build devices, known as “Blue Boxes” to replicate the tones in order to make free phone calls. 2600 Magazine contains articles on hacking theory & philosophy and often divulges security holes in corporate and government systems. While the magazine has been often criticized for this practice, Editor and Publisher Eric Corley (aka Emmanuel Goldstein) defends the practice in two ways – “Consumers should know if their services are unsafe” and “This is the only way that we can get businesses to fix security holes. We have called businesses and told them of problems and they have ignored us.” Corley also points out that about half of his subscribers are computer security professionals.
His point of businesses ignoring security holes was brought out a number of years ago when a 5-button lock system, purporting to be unbreakable, was installed on dorm rooms at SUNY – Stony Brook after a woman was attacked. A student at Stony Brook, a 2600 member, was able to crack the system but was unable to get anyone’s attention, particularly after it was pointed out that the same locks were used on secure areas at JFK and on FedEx boxes around New York. 2600 was able to interest NBC News in the story and NBC filmed a 2600 member holding up a big white envelope with 2600 clearly visible on it, putting the envelope into a FedEx Box, kneeling and keying number combinations, opening the box, and holding up the envelope! The systems got changed shortly after that!
The monthly NYC 2600 Meetings are held on the 1st Friday of every month at 6 PM in the FoodCourt of the CitiCorp Center, 153 E. 53rd Street. Additionally, Goldstein hosts a weekly radio show, “Off The Hook” on WBAI (99.5 FM).
This year, 2600 will host the 11th bi-annual H.O.P.E (“Hackers On Planet Earth” -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hackers_on_Planet_Earth - The_Next_HOPE) at the Hotel Pennsylvania, July 22 – 26th. This is a conference that brings together hackers, intelligence officials, law enforcement, and other interested parties (previous keynote speakers have included Edward Snowden (via video conference), Steve Wozniak, Daniel Ellsberg, Richard Stallman, and Kevin Mitnick) – and puts the lie to the statement that “all hackers are evil.”

                                Not Evil

I welcome comments on this piece to johnmac13@gmail.com.
John F. McMullen is a writer, poet, college professor and radio host. Links to other writings, Podcasts, & Radio Broadcasts at www.johnmac13.com, and his books are available on Amazon.

© 2015 John F. McMullen

Listen To My Conversation With Erotic and Crime Writer Erin O'Riordan On The johnmac Radio Show

Listen to my February 7th conversation with novelist and short story writer Erin O'Riordan by clicking
https://s3.amazonaws.com/btr.shows/show/8/265/show_8265771.mp3 on your browser.


You may also get further information on Erin's erotic and crime writing (as well as the work of her editor, co-writer, and husband, Tit Elingtin, who also joined us on the show) by clicking  http://www.titelingtin.com/

My guest Sunday evening, February 14, 2016 at 7:00PM Eastern time, is medical professional and political activist Amy M. McMullen. Join us on your web browser by clicking
www.blogtalkradio.com/johmac13/2016/02/15/weekly-johnmac-radio-show and / or your telephone by dialing 646 716-9756

Future guests on the show in the February and March schedule include Scholastic Editor and author Sari Wilson; with physicist, game developer, Chief Creative Officer at Playscreen, and Chief Marketing Officer at TriceratWilliam Volk;   science fiction author and screenwriter David Gerrold; and radio host Jordan Rich.

I hope that you'll join us every week for interesting conversations and audience participations. The mp3s for all 125 previous shows are available at www.johnmac13.com under the radio show tab. Have a binge weekend and listen to shows with Sara Paretsky, Chick Donohue, Paul Levinson, Thomas Kelly, Pamela McCorduck, Coleen Rowley, Frank Mulderrig, Steve Levy, Michele Somerville, Dan Sheehan, F. Paul Wilson, Rev. Claire Woodley, Andrew Gross, Luke McMullen, Marc Rasch, Ein O'Riordan, Rob Mercante, Sally Sypher, Jim Caufield, David Brin, Fred Gillen, Jr., Karen DeWitt, George Hopkins, Artie Burns, Sally Wiener Grotta, Peter Walsh, Vinnie Dacquino, John Riciari, Dennis Murray, Bill Machrone, Rev. Tom Sandi, Ellen Hancock, Jim Taylor, Bob Tendy, Paul Wallich, Wendy Corsi Staub, Jim Casey, Lorien Pratt, Don Delaney, Walter Jon Williams, Renee Esterbrooks, Bob Frankston, F. Paul Wilson, Gail Thackeray, Joseph Hankin, Frank Hickey, the late Al DelBello, Tod Roach, Dave Farber, Gene Schneider, Norb Vonnegut, Hedrick Smith, and many others - writers, academics, technologists, poets, politicians, clergy, journalists, law enforcement -- a wide variety of interesting people with something to say!


Sunday, January 31, 2016

Listen To My Conversation With Musician Fred Gillen, Jr. On The Weekly johnmac Radio Show

My conversation on the January 31st johnmac Radio Show with musician, singer / songwriter, poet, engineer, and recording studio proprietor Fred Gillen Jr. is available at:
https://s3.amazonaws.com/btr.shows/show/8/234/show_8234935.mp3 and Fred's own website, with links to his lyrics, recordings, and general information, is located at
http://www.fredgillenjr.com/index.html

Join us next Sunday, February 7th at 7:00 PM for the Weekly johnmac Radio Show to hear (and / or join in) my conversation with novelist Erin O'Riordan by clicking: www.blogtalkradio.com/johmac13/2016/02/08/the-weekly-johnmac-radio-show on your web browser or dialing 646 716-9756 on your telephone. 

The following Sunday, February 14, my guest will be medical professional and activist Amy McMullen and, on the following week, February 21st, Scholastic Editor and author Sari Wilson with physicist, game developer, Chief Creative Officer at Playscreen, and Chief Marketing Officer at TriceratWilliam Volk rounding out the month on the 28th.

March's lineup tentatively includes novelists Chelsea CainAllison BrennenKimberly Fox, and David Gerrold.

I hope that you'll join us every week for interesting conversations and audience participations. The mp3s for all 124 previous shows are available at www.johnmac13.com under the radio show tab. Have a binge weekend and listen to shows with Sara Paretsky, Chick Donohue, Paul Levinson, Thomas Kelly, Pamela McCorduck, Coleen Rowley, Frank Mulderrig, Steve Levy, Michele Somerville, Dan Sheehan, F. Paul Wilson, Rev. Claire Woodley, Andrew Gross, Luke McMullen, Marc Rasch, Rob Mercante, Sally Sypher, Jim Caufield, David Brin, Fred Gillen, Jr., Karen DeWitt, George Hopkins, Artie Burns, Sally Wiener Grotta, Peter Walsh, Vinnie Dacquino, John Riciari, Dennis Murray, Bill Machrone, Rev. Tom Sandi, Ellen Hancock, Jim Taylor, Bob Tendy, Paul Wallich, Wendy Corsi Staub, Jim Casey, Lorien Pratt, Don Delaney, Walter Jon Williams, Renee Esterbrooks, Bob Frankston, F. Paul Wilson, Gail Thackeray, Joseph Hankin, Frank Hickey, the late Al DelBello, Tod Roach, Dave Farber, Gene Schneider, Norb Vonnegut, Hedrick Smith, and many others - writers, academics, technologists, poets, politicians, clergy, journalists, law enforcement -- a wide variety of interesting people with something to say!



Saturday, January 30, 2016

Rado Show Schedule & Facts

Join us on Sunday evening, January 31st at 7:00 PM for the Weekly johnmac Radio Show to hear (and / or join in) my conversation with musician, songwriter, and singerFred Gillen Jr. by clicking:www.blogtalkradio.com/johmac13/2016/02/01/weekly-johnmac-radio-showon your web browser or dialing 
646 716-9756 on your telephone (use the telephone to join the conversation).

Then join us the following Sunday, Sunday, February 7th at 7:00 PM for the Weekly johnmac Radio Show to hear (and / or join in) my conversation with novelist Erin O'Riordan by clicking: www.blogtalkradio.com/johmac13/2016/02/08/the-weekly-johnmac-radio-show on your web browser or dialing the same 
646 716-9756 on your telephone. The following Sunday, February 14, my guest will be medical professional and activist Amy McMullen and, on the following week, February 21st Scholastic Editor and author Sari Wilson with physicist, game developer, Chief Creative Officer at Playscreen, and Chief Marketing Officer at TriceratWilliam Volk rounding the month on the 28th. March's lineup tentatively includes novelists Chelsea CainAllison BrennenKimberly Fox, and David Gerrold.

I hope that you'll join us every week for interesting conversations and audience participations. The mp3s for all 124 previous shows are available at www.johnmac13.com under the radio show tab. Have a binge weekend and listen to shows with Sara Paretsky, Chick Donohue, Paul Levinson, Thomas Kelly, Pamela McCorduck, Coleen Rowley, Frank Mulderrig, Steve Levy, Michele Somerville, Dan Sheehan, F. Paul Wilson, Rev. Claire Woodley, Andrew Gross, Luke McMullen, Marc Rasch, Rob Mercante, Sally Sypher, Jim Caufield, David Brin, Karen DeWitt, George Hopkins, Artie Burns, Sally Wiener Grotta, Vinnie Dacquino, John Riciari, Dennis Murray, Bill Machrone, Rev. Tom Sandi, Ellen Hancock, Jim Taylor, Bob Tendy, Paul Wallich, Wendy Corsi Staub, Jim Casey, Lorien Pratt, Don Delaney, Walter Jon Williams, Renee Esterbrooks, Bob Frankston, F. Paul Wilson, Gail Thackeray, Joseph Hankin, Frank Hickey, the late Al DelBello, Tod Roach, Dave Farber, Gene Schneider, Norb Vonnegut, Hedrick Smith, and many others - writers, academics, technologists, poets, politicians, clergy, journalists, law enforcement -- a wide variety of interesting people with something to say!



Sunday, January 24, 2016

My conversation on the " johnmac Radio Show " with Dr. Joseph E. Nyre, President, Iona Colleg

My conversation tonight on the " johnmac Radio Show " with Dr. Joseph E. Nyre, President, Iona College is available athttps://s3.amazonaws.com/btr.shows/show/8/…/show_8234897.mp3
Among the points discussed in this enjoyable conversation were Dr. Nyre's personal history and his road to Iona through a Wisconsin childhood, the US Navy, college, graduate school, and PhD Program as well as a career in itself in the providing of mental health services and the study of autism; Iona as a continuation of the legacy of the Christian Brothers of Ireland; Iona as a growing (and caring) educational institution with new degree programs, structures, endowments, and sports accomplishments; the cost of higher education; and other topics.

Next Sunday, January 31st, at 7:00PM, my guest will be musician, songwriter, and singer Fred Gillen Jr. Join us by clicking
www.blogtalkradio.com/johmac13/2016/02/01/weekly-johnmac-radio-show on your browser or by dialing 646 716-9756 on your telephone (use the telephone to join the conversation).

hope that you'll join us every week for interesting conversations and audience participations. The mp3s for all 121 previous shows are available at www.johnmac13.com under the radio show tab. Have a binge weekend and listen to shows with Sara Paretsky, Chick Donohue, Paul Levinson, Thomas Kelly, Pamela McCorduck, Coleen Rowley, Steve Levy, Michele Somerville, F. Paul Wilson, Rev. Claire Woodley, Andrew Gross, Luke McMullen, Marc Rasch, Sallie Sypher, Jim Caufield, David Brin, Karen DeWitt, Sally Wiener Grotta, John Riciari, Dennis Murray, Bill Machrone, Rev. Tom Sandi, Walter Jon Williams, Wendy Corsi Staub, Lorien Pratt, Don Delaney, Renee Esterbrooks, Bob Frankston, F. Paul Wilson, Dave Farber, Norb Vonnegut, Joseph Hankin, Frank Hickey, the late Al DelBello, Hedrick Smith, and many others - writers, academics, technologists, poets, politicians, clergy, journalists, law enforcement -- a wide variety of interesting people with something to say!


Wednesday, January 20, 2016

It Takes Software

(This column originally appeared in the Westchester Guardian of January 21, 2016 -- http://www.westchesterguardian.com/1_21_16/wg_1_21_fin.pdf)

Creative Disruption  
by John F. McMullen   
Creative Disruption is a continuing series examining the impact of constantly accelerating technology on the world around us. These changes normally happen under our personal radar until we find that the world as we knew it is no more.  

It Takes Software
Reports from the recent Computer & Electronics Show in Las Vegas (CES2016) were awash with news of the “Oculus Rift,Oculus VR’s Virtual Reality Helmet. At the show, it was announced that the price of the equipment, when shipments begin on March 28th, will be five hundred and ninety-nine dollars ($599) and that pre-orders are already sold out.

Oculus VR, now owned by Facebook, takes a risk in having the most talked about and first commercial Virtual Reality Helmet on the market in thirty years (Jaron Lanier and Thomas Zimmerman founded VPL Research, Inc. in 1985 to sell VR goggles and gloves; Lanier is credited with popularizing the term “Virtual Reality). There are already a number of devices announced to compete with the Oculus Rift that are now available or soon will be (“The Best VR Headsets” -- http://www.wareable.com/headgear/the-best-ar-and-vr-headsets), from the $29.95 “Google Cardboard” to the $3,000 “Microsoft HoloLens.

More importantly, there is little that you can do with these technologically innovative systems. To be sure, there are over two hundred Cardboard compatible apps and a number of game titles have been announced for the Rift. Yet, the biggest applications news to come out of Las Vegas was the use of the technology for immersive porn viewing (“VR Porn Reactions on Oculus From First-Time Virtual Reality Viewers” -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLqVxC6JWIM). Although an Oculus spokesperson has been quoted as saying that Oculus will block pornographic material on the Rift (https://reason.com/blog/2015/06/15/oculus-rift-will-not-allow-virtual-reali; Note: RealDoll creator Matt McMullen, quoted in the Reason article, is no relation to this writer).

Even with the possibility of pornographic material being available for these devices, there is yet no software and / or content available for these devices that makes their purchase attractive, even, mandatory – in short, no “killer app!” This may not be a problem when one is thinking of ordering a Google Cardboard or even a $79 “Freefly VR Headset but it certainly will be for a Rift or a $699 “Avegant Glyph” (more on the cost later in the column).

A little history:
-- In 1979, when Barbara McMullen and I were about to leave Morgan Stanley to form our own technology consulting business (The firm graciously gave us enough office furniture, desks, chairs, & file cabinets, to fill three floors of office space), we were standing by an elevator waiting to go to lunch when Seth Gersh, an executive from the firm’s trading area, came along, stopped to wish us luck, and asked if we had seen “the computer on Ben Rosen’s desk.” At that time, I had never seen a true computer on a desk, only terminals, and didn’t know who Ben Rosen was (It turned out that he was the firm’s Electronics Analyst who became a good friend and was helpful in the success of our business).

We put off going to lunch and went off to meet Ben Rosen and see the computer on his desk – it turned out to be an Apple II – and after Ben showed us a Portfolio program from Dow Jones and a game, I decided to “get one of those to fool around with” to see if it could be useful to our business which was intended to specialize in large “mainframe” systems for brokerage firms, our expertise at the time.

We did get an Apple II and, about a week later, when sitting with Charlie Griswold, the president of our first consulting client, BTSI, I mentioned the Apple II and he said “you should speak to my doctor, Bill Merlino. He’s the Apple distributor for South Jersey. We were incredulous that a doctor could be an Apple distributor – it turned out that he wasn’t; he had opened a retail computer store after falling in love with the Apple product and determining that others would too (Bill became both a business partner and a close friend, a friendship that continues to this day). Still, the Apple II did little more than play games and show potential.

The potential was realized a short time later when Ben Rosen, writing in the “Morgan Stanley Electronics Newsletter” about “VisiCalc,” the first computer spreadsheet (hard to remember a day when there wasn’t one? This was 1979 – less than 40 years ago) that it “would be the software tail that wagged the hardware dog” (translation – it would make people buy a computer, at that time only an Apple II costing from $3,500 to $10,000, depending on the size and quality of the monitor and the quality and speed of the printer to run VisiCalc, a $100 program).

Rosen was prescient – VisiCalc became the first killer app, becoming the reason that firms and professionals “had to buy” microcomputers and it and the Apple II became the forerunners of Lotus’ “1-2-3,” Microsoft’s Excel, the IBM-PC, the Compaq Portable, and the Macintosh (both Lotus and Compaq were firms financed in large by Sevin-Rosen, the venture capital firm started by Ben Rosen and LJ Sevin; on a personal note, it changed the direction of my firm’s business as we specialized on microcomputer software for companies through the United States and Mexico and led to the principals expanding into writing and teaching).

-- Although the spreadsheet and, later, word processing, database and telecommunications programs made microcomputers mandatory for business – from large corporations all the way down to home office professionals, it had done little to crack the consumer market. The Graphical User Interface (“GUI”) Macintosh had brought computers into advertising firms and publishers but had little impact beyond that. Microsoft got into the GUI arena with “Windows,” “Windows 2”, & “Windows 287” but they were all basically useless due to the screen resolution of PC monitors and the limited memory of MS-DOS. When “Windows 3.0” and “3.1” were introduced, they really worked – but they were hated by the computer professionals who both correctly said “Windows is inefficient and uses too much overhead” and “We can do more at the command line” but really meant “I don’t want to give up being the “high priest of computing.

The Internet held hope because of the many, many documents available but the programs (“Gopher,” “Archie,” Veronica,” “WAIS,” etc.) necessary to access them were hard to use for the average “non-computer” person.

Then, the World Wide Web was developed by computer consultant Tim Berners-Lee and, thereafter and more importantly, a team at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana led by Marc Andreessen, developed the first Graphical Browser, “Mosaic” for the WWW. The use of Mosaic required a Graphical User Interface, the Macintosh, “X-Windows” for UNIX, or Windows 3.x for MS-DOS systems and computer users demanded that Windows be installed on their MS-DOS systems (Lotus and Word Perfect, the providers of the leading spreadsheet and word processing programs for MS-DOS did not develop Windows versions for their software and when the advent of Windows to the PC brought Excel and Word with it, WordPerfect and Lotus lost almost all of their market share and were eventually sold to other firms). The World Wide Web with a Graphical Browser soon became the killer app that brought computers into homes throughout the country.

There is no killer app yet for Virtual Reality and, when one considers the cost of the high-end systems, it may be sometime before one is reached. The costs listed above only relate to the cost of the helmets themselves. The Oculus Rift requires a computer system costing in excess of $1,000 (possibly up to $1,500). When one adds in the price of the Rift, we are now up to $1,600 - $2,100 and these figures do not include the cost of any games of other software to make the systems go. Wearable’s analysis of the “Best Games For The Oculus Rift” (http://www.wareable.com/oculus-rift/the-best-oculus-rift-games) lists prices from $9.99 to $20.00 with the large majority of the games having a price notation of “TBA” (“To Be Announced”) as they attempt to analyze the market.

Many analysts, based on the points made above, think that the present market for the Oculus Rift is “gamers,” many of whom already have very powerful PCs and do not have to move up to support the Rift. Until a consumer killer app comes along, that is my view -- for an opposing view, read Shel Israel’s “Why Oculus Rift Matters” (http://shelisrael.com/vr-moores-law-and-the-cost-of-playing-the-game/) in which he states “I believe that TrendForce is being just a little conservative in forecasting that ‘VR will be a $70 billion market in just four years’ (http://recode.net/2015/12/03/virtual-reality-market-seen-actually-generating-70-billion-by-2020/)”. The only way both of us can be right is if a killer app does appear!

I welcome comments on this piece to johnmac13@gmail.com.
John F. McMullen is a writer, poet, college professor and radio host. Links to other writings, Podcasts, & Radio Broadcasts at www.johnmac13.com, and his books are available on Amazon.

© 2015 John F. McMullen


 
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